Making Makerspaces Accessible with UDL

When it comes to libraries, the term “accessibility” might bring to mind physical and virtual access to library spaces such as ramps, wide aisles, adaptive technologies, and even 508 compliance. But what about learning? How can differently-abled individuals access the kinds of learning opportunities that libraries offer to the public?

That’s where UDL (Universal Design for Learning) comes in. And to illustrate how UDL can be applied to library learning events, I will use makerspaces as an example. In the table below are the three principles of UDL, along with suggestions for application to maker activity design.

UDL Principles

Maker Activity Design Suggestions

Principle I. Provide Multiple Means of Representation To embrace this principle, instructional or informational materials for makerspace activities should be provided in multiple forms (or in multiple ways) to facilitate differences in information processing. For example:

  • Break down instructions into simple, discrete steps
  • Provide instructions in multiple languages if necessary
  • Add simple visuals to enhance comprehension
  • Oral directions can be provided via screencasts, YouTube videos, or audio-enhanced static instruction
  • Hand-over-hand prompting can be useful for individuals with a variety of impairments
Principle II. Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression Learners should be give the freedom to express themselves in a way that is least restrictive to their disabilities. To embrace this principle, offering maker activities through multiple modalities should be a priority. For example:

  • Offer a selection of maker activities to choose from, both digital and physical
  • Provide a variety of materials for physical maker activities, e.g., different widths of yarn and sizes of needles for knitting
  • Adaptive technologies, such as voice-to-text software (e.g., Dragon Dictation) improve accessibility for digitally-based maker activities
  • Devices with touch screen capabilities are easier to interact with for individuals with a variety of impairments
Principle III. Provide Multiple Means of Engagement To embrace this principle, provide choice for level of engagement. For example:

  • Offer a quiet space for individuals with sensory issues to work alone
  • Identify individuals working on the periphery, or who seem to be “left out,” and pair them with partners to promote communication and collaboration
  • Offer maker activities that pique a wide variety of interests, e.g., technology, arts and crafts, science, language and culture
  • Ensure plenty of constructive feedback to motivate learners and foster self-regulation

The beauty of UDL is that it increases accessibility to learning for all individuals. This is especially important for libraries, where equity of access is a vital issue, yet awareness (especially for invisible disabilities) and expertise is often lacking.

Useful sources:

AccessSTEM

Achievement Products

National Center on Universal Design for Learning

 

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